Abstract/Details

The neglected song cycle: A study of Robert Schumann's “Vier Husarenlieder”, Opus 117


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

The purpose of this study is to provide a thorough analysis of Robert Schumann's Vier Husarenlieder, Opus 117. Research materials and reviews of this song cycle are few and far between, so an analysis of this work will hopefully be an aid to singers for studying and performing unknown Lieder. A better understanding of this song cycle should encourage baritone singers to include this work in their repertoire as this song cycle was specifically written for the baritone voice. The study will include an analysis of the German text and music. References will be made to analysis and reviews by other authors in order to provide background information on the poet Nikolaus Lenau, the composer Robert Schumann, the circumstances he faced when composing these songs, and the subject of the song cycle, the Hussars.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Music
Classification
0413: Music
Identifier / keyword
Communication and the arts; Germany; Schumann, Robert; Song cycle; Vier Husarenlieder
Title
The neglected song cycle: A study of Robert Schumann's “Vier Husarenlieder”, Opus 117
Author
Rada, Raphael Ramiro S.
Number of pages
44
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0202
Source
DAI-A 70/04, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109123654
Advisor
Gray, Donald
Committee member
Cuttino, Walter; Ottervik, Jennifer; Will, Jacob
University/institution
University of South Carolina
Department
Music Performance
University location
United States -- South Carolina
Degree
D.M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3354822
ProQuest document ID
304998851
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304998851
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