Abstract/Details

Internet use among African-American college students: An exploratory study


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

This study examined Internet use among African-American college students attending Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Students attending two Historically Black Colleges and Universities, one public and one private, were asked to complete a 43-item survey questionnaire regarding the frequency of Internet use, Internet applications most often used, and other factors to determine if the time spent on the Internet was pathological.

Results indicated that most of the African-American college students (76 percent) had used the Internet for more than three years. Use of the Internet for most African-American college students occurred at school (49 percent) or at home (47 percent) and they spent an average of two hours per day on-line. A small percentage of the students spent five to sixteen hours per day on the Internet, which indicates pathological Internet use. For forty-three percent of the students, their primary motivation for using the Internet was to learn and find school resources.

Indexing (details)


Subject
School administration;
Educational software;
African Americans;
Mass media
Classification
0514: School administration
0710: Educational software
0325: African Americans
0708: Mass media
Identifier / keyword
Communication and the arts; Social sciences; Education; African-American; College students; Internet
Title
Internet use among African-American college students: An exploratory study
Author
Robinson, Jannie W.
Number of pages
150
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
0075
Source
DAI-A 65/12, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780496167876, 0496167871
Advisor
Brown, Walter
University/institution
The George Washington University
University location
United States -- District of Columbia
Degree
Ed.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3156015
ProQuest document ID
304999125
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304999125
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