Abstract/Details

Linguistic side effects


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

Apparently noncompositional phenomena in natural languages can be analyzed like computational side effects in programming languages: anaphora can be analyzed like state, intensionality can be analyzed like environment, quantification can be analyzed like delimited control, and so on. We thus term apparently noncompositional phenomena in natural languages linguistic side effects. We put this new, general analogy to work in linguistics as well as programming-language theory.

In linguistics, we turn the continuation semantics for delimited control into a new implementation of quantification in type-logical grammar. This graphically-motivated implementation does not move nearby constituents apart or distant constituents together. Just as delimited control encodes many computational side effects, quantification encodes many linguistic side effects, in particular anaphora, interrogation, and polarity sensitivity. Using the programming-language concepts of evaluation order and multistage programming, we unify four linguistic phenomena that had been dealt with only separately before: linear scope in quantification, crossover in anaphora, superiority in interrogation, and linear order in polarity sensitivity. This unified account is the first to predict a complex pattern of interaction between anaphora and raised-wh questions, without any stipulation on both. It also provides the first concrete processing explanation of linear order in polarity sensitivity.

In programming-language theory, we transfer a duality between expressions and contexts from our analysis of quantification to a new programming language with delimited control. This duality exchanges call-by-value evaluation with call-by-name evaluation, thus extending a known duality from undelimited to delimited control. The same duality also exchanges the familiar let construct with the less-familiar shift construct, so that the latter can be understood in terms of the former.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Computer science;
Linguistics
Classification
0984: Computer science
0290: Linguistics
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences; Language, literature and linguistics; Compositionality; Evaluation order; Linguistic; Quantifier scope
Title
Linguistic side effects
Author
Shan, Chung-chieh
Number of pages
185
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
0084
Source
DAI-B 66/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542392566, 0542392569
Advisor
Shieber, Stuart
University/institution
Harvard University
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3194455
ProQuest document ID
305001490
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305001490
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