Abstract/Details

Social perceptions of wind energy in Texas: Proximity and NIMBY explored


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

Wind energy is now recognized as an important energy resource throughout the world. Within the United States, the state of Texas currently has the largest wind energy capacity with 7,115.66 total megawatts and an additional 1,651.35 megawatts under construction. With this rapid growth of wind energy capacity, it is important to achieve a better understanding of how wind energy is being perceived. This paper examines the social perceptions of wind energy in Texas and its associated environmental attitudes. The paper explores three main research strands: (i) describing the environmental attitudes of a population that is in close proximity to a wind farm development, (ii) determining the influence that proximity has on wind energy attitudes, and (iii) determining if the Not-In-My-Backyard (Nimby) phenomenon correctly explains human perceptions of wind energy.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Environmental science;
Energy
Classification
0768: Environmental science
0791: Energy
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Applied sciences; Texas; Wind energy
Title
Social perceptions of wind energy in Texas: Proximity and NIMBY explored
Author
Swofford, Jeffrey Alan
Number of pages
47
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0229
Source
MAI 47/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109082050
Advisor
Slattery, Michael
Committee member
Morgan, Tamie; Richards, Becky
University/institution
Texas Christian University
Department
College of Science and Engineering
University location
United States -- Texas
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1462516
ProQuest document ID
305004289
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305004289
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