Abstract/Details

Coarse analysis of multiscale systems: Diffuser flows, charged particle motion, and connections to averaging theory


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

We describe a technique for the efficient computation of the dominant-scale dynamics of a fluid system when only a high-fidelity simulation is available. Such a technique is desirable when governing equations for the dominant scales are unavailable, when model reduction is impractical, or when the original high-fidelity computation is expensive. We adopt the coarse analysis framework proposed by I. G. Kevrekidis (Comm. Math. Sci. 2003), where a computational superstructure is designed to use short-time, high-fidelity simulations to extract the dominant features for a multiscale system. We apply this technique to compute the dominant features of the compressible flow through a planar diffuser. We apply the proper orthogonal decomposition to classify the dominant and subdominant scales of diffuser flows. We derive a coarse projective Adams-Bashforth time integration routine and compute averaged diffuser flows. The results include accurate tracking of the dominant-scale dynamics for a range of parameter values for the computational superstructure. These results demonstrate that coarse analysis methods are useful for solving fluid flow problems of a multiscale nature.

In order to elucidate the behavior of coarse analysis techniques, we make comparisons to averaging theory. To this end, we derive governing equations for the average motion of charged particles in a magnetic field in a number of different settings. First, we apply a novel procedure, inspired by WKB theory and Whitham averaging, to average the variational principle. The resulting equations are equivalent to the guiding center equations for charged particle motion; this marks an instance where averaging and variational principles commute. Secondly, we apply Lagrangian averaging techniques, previously applied in fluid mechanics, to derive averaged equations. Making comparisons to the WKB/Whitham derivation allows for the necessary closure of the Lagrangian averaging formulation. We also discuss the Hamiltonian setting and show that averaged Hamiltonian systems may be derivable using concepts from coarse analysis. Finally, we apply a prototypical coarse analysis procedure to the system of charged particles and generate trajectories that resemble guiding center trajectories. We make connections to perturbation theory to derive guidelines for the design of coarse analysis techniques and comment on the prototypical coarse analysis application.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Aerospace materials;
Fluid dynamics;
Gases;
Mechanical engineering
Classification
0538: Aerospace materials
0759: Fluid dynamics
0759: Gases
0548: Mechanical engineering
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences; Pure sciences; Averaging theory; Charged particle; Diffuser; Multiscale systems
Title
Coarse analysis of multiscale systems: Diffuser flows, charged particle motion, and connections to averaging theory
Author
Fung, Jimmy
Number of pages
198
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
0037
Source
DAI-B 66/08, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542273759, 0542273756
Advisor
Murray, Richard M.
University/institution
California Institute of Technology
University location
United States -- California
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3185627
ProQuest document ID
305007612
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305007612
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