Abstract/Details

A psychometric evaluation of the Parental Behaviors and Beliefs About Anxiety Questionnaire among a child clinical population


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

Heritability studies have consistently demonstrated an increased risk for anxiety among the offspring of anxious parents (e.g., D. C. Beidel & S. M. Turner, 1997). Moreover, numerous parental styles, practices, behaviors, and beliefs have been linked to childhood anxiety (e.g., M. R. Dadds & P. M. Barrett, 1996; R. M. Rapee, 1997). However, the role parenting behaviors and beliefs play as mediators in the relationship between parental and child anxiety has yet to be systematically examined. This investigation describes the development of an objective parent-report instrument designed to assess 3 parental factors hypothesized to mediate the relationship between parental and child anxiety: overinvolvement with the child, parental beliefs about anxiety, and stimulus regulation. Only parental beliefs about the child's anxiety significantly mediated the relationship between parent and child anxiety, suggesting that it is not parental anxiety per se that predicts child anxiety, but rather the parent's beliefs about the extent to which anxiety is harmful for their child.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Psychotherapy;
Psychological tests
Classification
0622: Psychotherapy
0632: Psychological tests
Identifier / keyword
Psychology; Anxiety; Child; Parental Behaviors and Beliefs About Anxiety Questionnaire; Psychometric
Title
A psychometric evaluation of the Parental Behaviors and Beliefs About Anxiety Questionnaire among a child clinical population
Author
Francis, Sarah E.
Number of pages
208
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
0085
Source
DAI-B 66/08, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542260841, 0542260840
Advisor
Chorpita, Bruce F.
University/institution
University of Hawai'i at Manoa
University location
United States -- Hawaii
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3184493
ProQuest document ID
305009699
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305009699
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