Abstract/Details

Moral disagreement and ethical intuitionism: Implications and allegations


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

The meta-ethical view of intuitionism enjoyed a rise to prominence in the early-goings of the twentieth century on the strength of powerful support from the likes of Henry Sidgwick, G.E. Moore and W.D. Ross. Its fall from grace was even more precipitous however, and the view was widely considered defunct until the very recent efforts of some leading contemporary philosophers. Chief among the causes for the downfall of intuitionism was the objection from disagreement, which continues to exert influence both in the philosophical and general communities. In this thesis, I give an analysis of the phenomenon of moral disagreement that shows both that ethical intuitionism is a less susceptible target for this objection than other meta-ethical views, and that in fact the existence of moral disagreement presents no real problem for intuitionism at all.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Philosophy
Classification
0422: Philosophy
Identifier / keyword
Philosophy, religion and theology
Title
Moral disagreement and ethical intuitionism: Implications and allegations
Author
Fruh, Kyle
Number of pages
68
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
0051
Source
MAI 44/03M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542404139, 0542404133
Advisor
Huemer, Michael
University/institution
University of Colorado at Boulder
University location
United States -- Colorado
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1430190
ProQuest document ID
305010327
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305010327/abstract
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