Abstract/Details

Executive function as a mediator between depression and everyday functioning in community -dwelling older adults


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

The population of older adults in the United States is growing at a rapid rate, and as many as 27% report symptoms of depression. Both advanced age and depression pose risks for impairment of everyday activities. Therefore, one area of study that may be beneficial involves the relationship between higher order cognition (i.e., executive function), mood, and functional independence in the elderly. Because of the detrimental effects of executive dysfunction and depression on everyday functioning in older adults, the current study presents a cohesive model for examining the relationships among these factors in a nonclinical population of 177 community-dwelling older adults. Structural equation modeling provided good support for a mediational model, with executive function acting as a significant mediator in the relationship between depression and other predictor variables (i.e., age and education) and everyday functioning, which was assessed with two laboratory-based, observed measures of instrumental activities of daily living. Research and clinical implications, including areas for future research, are discussed.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Psychotherapy;
Gerontology
Classification
0622: Psychotherapy
0351: Gerontology
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Psychology; Community-dwelling; Depression; Executive function; Older adults
Title
Executive function as a mediator between depression and everyday functioning in community -dwelling older adults
Author
Darling, Laurie Z.
Number of pages
73
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
0005
Source
DAI-B 66/09, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542299889, 0542299887
Advisor
Wadley, Virginia G.
University/institution
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
University location
United States -- Alabama
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3187856
ProQuest document ID
305023447
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305023447
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