Abstract/Details

Standards or standardization? Problem solving and control at two elementary schools


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

Many consequences of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) and other standards-based reform efforts have been well documented, but that's not the case for the effects of these initiatives on standardizing school practices. Evidence generated in this comparative case study of two elementary schools, one higher performing and the other lower performing, suggests that the standardization of educational practices is another high stakes effect of NCLB and its related standards-based reforms that have important consequences for teachers and students. First, as schools reorganize to focus on standardization, tensions between form and function affect the qualifications of teachers working with the lowest performing students in particular. Second, distinctions between collaboration as a form of problem solving and as a form of social control affect teachers' responses to planned change efforts and influence the local standardization process in general. These observations raise troublesome issues related to the kind of policymaking implicit in NCLB itself.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Language arts;
Literacy;
Reading instruction
Classification
0279: Language arts
0535: Literacy
0535: Reading instruction
Identifier / keyword
Education; Collaboration; Elementary schools; No Child Left Behind; Policy; Problem-solving; Standards
Title
Standards or standardization? Problem solving and control at two elementary schools
Author
Donnelly, Whitney Bray
Number of pages
146
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
0029
Source
DAI-A 66/10, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542346262, 0542346265
Advisor
Wagner, Jon C.
University/institution
University of California, Davis
University location
United States -- California
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3191114
ProQuest document ID
305030735
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305030735
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