Abstract/Details

Linguistic variation within Gumuz: A study of the relationship between historical change and intelligibility


2004 2004

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Abstract (summary)

The Gumuz language is spoken by roughly 160,000 people across the Blue Nile region of Ethiopia and Sudan (Grimes 2004). Gumuz is the sole member of the Gumuz family which is part of the larger Nilo-Saharan super-family (Bender 1996a) and is considered to be a single language whose several varieties are mutually intelligible (Bender 1975, Unseth 1984). Recent studies regarding intelligbility, however, suggest the latter is not the case, documenting various levels of intelligibility between varieties, some of which are asymmetrical (Ahland et al. 2002). This thesis provides an historical analysis of Gumuz spoken in eight locations within Ethiopia and explores the relationship between historical change and intelligibility across these Gumuz varieties, suggesting that historical innovation is the key to direction of intelligibility. That is, the less innovative the language variety, the more likely other varieties of the language will be able to understand it.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Linguistics;
Cultural anthropology
Classification
0290: Linguistics
0326: Cultural anthropology
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Language, literature and linguistics; Ethiopia; Sudan
Title
Linguistic variation within Gumuz: A study of the relationship between historical change and intelligibility
Author
Ahland, Colleen Anne
Number of pages
195
Publication year
2004
Degree date
2004
School code
2502
Source
MAI 43/01M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Edmondson, Jerold
University/institution
The University of Texas at Arlington
University location
United States -- Texas
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1421233
ProQuest document ID
305058782
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305058782
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