Abstract/Details

Mechanisms of transfer


2004 2004

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Abstract (summary)

A central goal of cognitive science is to develop a general theory of transfer to explain how people use and apply their prior knowledge to solve new problems. Two transfer hypotheses were investigated in the current work. First, that there is no single transfer mechanism, but multiple ones. These mechanisms include (but are not limited to) analogy, knowledge compilation, and error-correction. Second, the particular profile (mix) of transfer processes depends on both (a) the knowledge actually present and how it is represented, and (b) the processing demands of the transfer task. These hypotheses were investigated in two laboratory training experiments. Results from experiment 1 support the hypothesis that there are multiple mechanisms of transfer that are distinct and identifiable. Each mechanism was shown to predict specific behavioral patterns of human performance under particular transfer conditions. The results from experiment 2 provide support for the hypothesis that people adaptively shift between transfer mechanisms depending on their prior knowledge and the characteristics of the task environment. A framework is proposed for the development of a general theory of transfer based on multiple mechanisms and implications of the theory are discussed for measuring and understanding knowledge transfer.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Cognitive therapy;
Psychology;
Experiments
Classification
0633: Cognitive therapy
0623: Psychology
0623: Experiments
Identifier / keyword
Psychology; Analogy; Learning; Problem-solving; Transfer
Title
Mechanisms of transfer
Author
Nokes, Timothy James
Number of pages
221
Publication year
2004
Degree date
2004
School code
0799
Source
DAI-B 65/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780496149513, 0496149512
Advisor
Ohlsson, Stellan
University/institution
University of Illinois at Chicago
University location
United States -- Illinois
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3154466
ProQuest document ID
305073476
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305073476
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