Abstract/Details

So tell me, what's different but the skin I'm in? Seven adolescent black girls making sense of their experiences in an online school book club featuring African American young adult literature


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

Believing the claim made by Black feminist research and scholarship that Black women writers and Black female social networks were safe spaces for Black females to come to voice, this qualitative multiple case study examined how seven adolescent Black females enrolled in a public virtual charter high school positioned themselves as they responded to contemporary realistic young adult fiction written by African American female authors in an online single-gendered book club. This study captured participants as some interacted in Tuesday's group and the others in the Thursday's group. Interpretivist methods are used to specifically examine the ways in which the participants responded to the spaces provided: (a) an online chat room, (b) a single-gendered book club, and (c) African American contemporary realistic young adult fiction. The participants' responses confirmed the argument made by some educational researchers that identities are fluid and multifaceted. Moreover, the participants' responses to the spaces provided called into question Black feminist claims that Black women's writers and Black female social networks are safe spaces. Although most participants identified the anonymity as the component that made the online chat room a safe wholesome environment, one participant, in particular found the anonymity as the catalyst that led to the disrespect that erupted in her group. Furthermore, some participants described their experiences in the single-gendered book club as contentious while others described their experiences as fun and comfortable.

This study problematizes the notion that online book clubs are neutral spaces, devoid of the power issues that operate in small group classroom discussions. Some found the literature mirrored their experiences, while others struggled to connect with protagonists and issues addressed in the literature. In addition, the participants' responses to the online single-gendered book club depended on the group dynamics and the literature selected for the study. Findings in this study suggested that adolescent Black females reading contemporary realistic young adult fiction written by African American female writers was not always a safe space as described by some Black feminist scholars. The findings revealed that race was more complex, and as a result, the exact match from literature to girls was not enough to meet their needs. Thus, the findings suggested that the online single-gendered book club featuring African American contemporary realistic young adult fiction was no panacea in adolescent Black females' coming to voice.

Indexing (details)


Subject
African American Studies;
Black studies;
Secondary education;
Curriculum development
Classification
0296: African American Studies
0325: Black studies
0533: Secondary education
0727: Curriculum development
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Education; Adolescent; Adolescent girls; African-American; African-American young adult literature; Book clubs; Girls; Literacy education; Online; Secondary education; Young adult literature
Title
So tell me, what's different but the skin I'm in? Seven adolescent black girls making sense of their experiences in an online school book club featuring African American young adult literature
Author
Dillard, Benita Rutonya
Number of pages
226
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0506
Source
DAI-A 71/03, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109637656
Advisor
Harper, Helen; Bean, Thomas
Committee member
Helmbold, Lois; McKinney, Marilyn; Olafson, Lori
University/institution
University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Department
Curriculum and Instruction
University location
United States -- Nevada
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3391465
ProQuest document ID
305091712
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305091712
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