Abstract/Details

The archaeology of childhood: Toys in 19<sup>th</sup> century upstate New York


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

Much of the historical literature on 19th century childhood, including attitudes towards toys and other children’s material, originated from and was written for the urban middle class. Rural and working class families often lived realities inconsistent with middle class values concerning children-raising such as opposition to child labor. By the mid 19th century, American social discourse emphasized the importance of a childhood with certain middle class attributes and specific children’s materials in perpetuating healthy, successful, middle class families and allowing lower class families the possibility of social mobility. I compare the children’s material excavated from rural and urban sites across New York State. I argue that rather than an urban and rural difference in children’s material as expected from historical sources, there is a greater temporal difference. Children’s materials appear in greater numbers and diversity at both urban and rural New York State sites following the Civil War.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Archaeology;
American history
Classification
0324: Archaeology
0337: American history
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Childhood; Children; Class; New York; Rural children; Toys; Urban children
Title
The archaeology of childhood: Toys in 19<sup>th</sup> century upstate New York
Author
Bunow, Miriam Jennie
Number of pages
127
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0792
Source
MAI 47/06M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109294446
Advisor
McGuire, Randall
Committee member
O'Donovan, Maria
University/institution
State University of New York at Binghamton
Department
Anthropology
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1467542
ProQuest document ID
305109858
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305109858
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