Abstract/Details

‘It will be social’: Black women writers and the postwar era 1945–1960


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

This study used a Black feminist critical framework to examine the conditions that influence the production of black women's fiction during the postwar era (1945–60).

The novels of Ann Petry, Dorothy West and Paule Marshall were studied as artifacts that were shaped by the cultural and political climate of this crucial period in American history. A survey was also conducted of their associations with members and organizations in the American Left to determine what impact their social activism had on their lives and art.

It was determined that these writers' political engagement played a significant role in the creation of transformative narratives about the power of black women to resist oppression in all of its forms. As a consequence of their contribution to a rich black feminist literary tradition, these postwar black women fiction writers serve as important foremothers to later generations of black women artists.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Black studies;
Caribbean literature;
Womens studies;
American literature;
Gender studies
Classification
0325: Black studies
0360: Caribbean literature
0453: Womens studies
0591: American literature
0733: Gender studies
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Language, literature and linguistics; African American fiction; African American women's fiction; American Left; Barbados; Black feminist literature; Black women; Marshall, Paule; Petry, Anne; Postwar; Postwar America; West, Dorothy; Women writers
Title
‘It will be social’: Black women writers and the postwar era 1945–1960
Author
Caldwell, Katrina Myers
Number of pages
268
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0799
Source
DAI-A 70/07, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109241969
Advisor
Cirillo, Nancy
University/institution
University of Illinois at Chicago
University location
United States -- Illinois
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3364592
ProQuest document ID
305118631
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305118631
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