Abstract/Details

Indigenous peoples' rights, the environment and culture: Translating international standards into effective implementation


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

This dissertation aims to promote the restoration of indigenous peoples' resource rights while also sustaining the environment and enabling cultural sustainability. A premise behind the research is that implementing policy would better account for indigenous interests, the environment and culture if it were thoroughly informed by international standards and the perspectives of those directly affected. Toward this end, the dissertation includes a review of international legal sources for contemporary standards pertaining to indigenous peoples' resource rights, field studies from Canada, the US and Panama focusing in detail on three distinct approaches to indigenous resource policy and offering interview-based feedback on the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. The dissertation concludes with comparative summaries of the three field studies and a series of specific, yet flexible options for creating more effective policy.

Indexing (details)


Subject
International law;
Environmental science
Classification
0616: International law
0768: Environmental science
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Social sciences; Aboriginal; Culture; Environment; Indigenous; Indigenous rights; International standards; Native; Rights
Title
Indigenous peoples' rights, the environment and culture: Translating international standards into effective implementation
Author
Reyes, David Michael
Number of pages
456
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0930
Source
DAI-A 70/06, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109221060
Advisor
Hannum, Hurst
Committee member
Moomaw, William; Shelton, Dinah
University/institution
Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy (Tufts University)
Department
International Law and Organization
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3359765
ProQuest document ID
305130767
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305130767/abstract
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