Abstract/Details

Transference of self -efficacy beliefs from leaders to followers and its link to perceptions of leaders being transformational


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

This exploratory research study aimed to determine whether transference of self-efficacy beliefs exists from leaders to followers. In addition, the study sought to ascertain whether followers’ self-efficacy beliefs affect their perceptions of the effectiveness of their leaders. The research looked at units within the U.S. Army stationed in Hohenfels, Germany. Data from 40 distinct units were gathered. The leaders’ self-assessment of their self-efficacy beliefs was moderately linked to the levels of self-efficacy among followers. Based on the followers’ self-report assessment of the effectiveness of their leaders, the study illustrated that followers’ levels of self-efficacy beliefs had a significant positive correlation to them viewing their leaders’ behavior as transformational or not. The findings of the study, along with possible implications, limitations, and recommendations, are offered.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Behavioral psychology;
Management;
Cognitive psychology
Classification
0384: Behavioral psychology
0454: Management
0633: Cognitive psychology
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Psychology; Followers; Follwer perceptions; Leader-follower relationships; Leadership; Self-efficacy; Transformational behavior; Transformational leadership
Title
Transference of self -efficacy beliefs from leaders to followers and its link to perceptions of leaders being transformational
Author
Howard, Christopher S.
Number of pages
91
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
1058
Source
DAI-A 70/10, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109412680
Advisor
Carr, Paul B.
University/institution
Regent University
University location
United States -- Virginia
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3377766
ProQuest document ID
305131765
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305131765
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