Abstract/Details

Crack propagation and fracture in engineered stress profile glass


2004 2004

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Abstract (summary)

Ion exchange procedures have been developed for soda lime silicate and soda alumina silicate glasses that produce a maximum compressive stress below the surface of the material. These glasses can form stable surface cracks under applied tensile stress, resulting in rising apparent R-curve behavior and reduced strength variability as a function of flaw size in the material. Glass exhibiting this behavior has been termed engineered stress profile (ESP) glass. In this work, eight ion exchange procedures and three surface preparation methods were used to produce a range of ESP glasses. An experimental stress measurement method utilizing iterated optical retardation and progressive etching was developed to determine the stress profile in the glass surfaces. Based on the measured stress profiles, a weight function approach was used to predict stress intensity factors as a function of crack geometry, and thus determine crack propagation paths as a function of initial flaw size, residual and applied stresses, and material fracture toughness. These calculations were used to predict fracture strength distribution, crack stability, and the potential for multiple surface cracking. Predicted values were compared to experimental observations of crack growth and fracture behavior, and with measured fracture strength distributions.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Materials science
Classification
0794: Materials science
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences; Crack propagation; Fracture; Glass; Stress profile
Title
Crack propagation and fracture in engineered stress profile glass
Author
Abrams, Matthew B.
Number of pages
178
Publication year
2004
Degree date
2004
School code
0176
Source
DAI-B 65/07, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Green, David J.
University/institution
The Pennsylvania State University
University location
United States -- Pennsylvania
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3140989
ProQuest document ID
305145005
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305145005
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