Abstract/Details

The relationship among the impostor phenomenon, self -esteem, and gender in high achieving African Americans


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

People have a tendency to assume that external success is an indication of internal satisfaction. Additionally, people often believe that if they see an individual as successful that he or she sees self in the same manner. This is not always true. The impostor phenomenon is a psychological construct that occurs in high achieving individuals who, despite their great success, feel fraudulent in certain areas of their lives. The purpose of this quantitative, descriptive, correlational study is to examine the relationship among feelings of fraud, self-esteem, and gender in high achieving African Americans. Specifically, a convenience sample from two mid-western university African American alumni associations was used in this study. A three-part Web-based survey was completed by the participants that included the Clance Impostor Phenomenon Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and a demographic survey. High achieving was defined by an annual income greater than the U.S median average and a profession. Statistically significant findings included the presence of impostor feelings in high achieving African Americans. Findings did not support a relationship among gender, self-esteem, and impostor scores. Recommendations included: differentiating between inner and outer self-esteem, examining motivation and family dynamics.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Black studies;
Clinical psychology;
Personality psychology
Classification
0325: Black studies
0622: Clinical psychology
0625: Personality psychology
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Psychology; African-American; Gender; High-achieving; Impostor phenomenon; Self-esteem
Title
The relationship among the impostor phenomenon, self -esteem, and gender in high achieving African Americans
Author
Loury Lomas, Lisa M.
Number of pages
76
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
1351
Source
DAI-B 70/02, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109049251
Advisor
Kramer, Thomas
Committee member
Chapell, Kelley; Malpass, John
University/institution
Capella University
Department
School of Psychology
University location
United States -- Minnesota
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3344898
ProQuest document ID
305158645
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305158645
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