Abstract/Details

Community college presidents in the new millennium: Competencies for leadership as identified by position announcements and relationship to board type


2004 2004

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

The purpose of this study was to determine if position announcements and position descriptions posted in The Chronicle of Higher Education , (2002) align with (1) the competencies established by Desjardins and Huff for the community college president in the new millennium and (2) whether these competencies vary with different board structures, majority board gender composition, or gender of board president. Seventy-six position announcements were compared to a Community College Leadership Competency model in a mixed model research design, using both qualitative and quantitative data analysis. Inter-rater reliability was established by having two educators independently code 20 position announcements and then compare these results to the researcher's results.

The top six competencies, which appeared in 92 percent or more of the position announcements included: Demonstrates High-involvement Leadership; Creates a Shared Vision; Manages Finances Proactively; Influences Strategically; Ensures Effective Communication; and Maintains High Standards. The top 10 competencies appeared in 86 percent or more of all announcements.

Local elected boards identified three competencies significantly more often than local appointed boards: Creates a Student-centered Learning Environment; Invests in Professional Development; and Corrects Performance Problems.

Local boards identified three competencies significantly more often than state boards: Recognizes and Rewards Excellence; Establishes Effective Board Relations; and Maintains High Standards.

Elected boards identified three competencies significantly more often than appointed boards: Maintains Equilibrium; Invests in Professional Development; and Corrects Performance Problems.

Boards with male presidents identified one competency significantly more often than boards with female presidents: Creates a Student-centered Learning Environment. Boards with female presidents identified one competency significantly more often than boards with male presidents: Fosters Creativity and Innovation.

To determine the relationship between the rankings of the competencies by various groups the Spearman's Rank-Difference Coefficient Correlation was administered. The rankings of the competencies by types of boards supported no significant differences in the average rank assigned by each of the three groups compared.

These findings indicate that many of the Desjardins and Huff competencies can be found in position announcements for community college presidents. Although differences between board types were expected, only minor differences materialized within the framework of this study.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Community colleges;
School administration
Classification
0275: Community colleges
0514: School administration
Identifier / keyword
Education; Board of trustees; Community college presidents; Gender; Leadership
Title
Community college presidents in the new millennium: Competencies for leadership as identified by position announcements and relationship to board type
Author
Olson-Nikunen, Shari L.
Number of pages
131
Publication year
2004
Degree date
2004
School code
0156
Source
DAI-A 65/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780496152438, 0496152432
Advisor
Meyer, Katrina
University/institution
The University of North Dakota
University location
United States -- North Dakota
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3154786
ProQuest document ID
305166209
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305166209
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.