Abstract/Details

Childhood physical and sexual abuse and adult mental health outcomes


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

Research on the long-term effects of sexual and physical abuse during childhood has produced conflicting results. While some studies have found increases in mental health symptoms, others have found no long-term effects of child abuse. Little is known about the differential mental health effects of abuse by a caregiver (high-betrayal trauma) versus abuse by a non-caregiver (low-betrayal trauma), developed from “Betrayal Trauma Theory” (Freyd, 1996; Freyd, DePrince & Gleaves, 2007). The present study is a retrospective, cross-sectional survey study examining exposure to childhood sexual and physical abuse and adult mental health symptoms, possible outcomes of high-betrayal trauma, as well as other related variables including demographics in a sample (N=534) of ethnically diverse undergraduate college students in rural Hawai'i. Findings support the hypothesis that childhood abuse predicts adult negative mental health symptoms but did not support the hypothesis that high-betrayal trauma would be predictive of greater mental health symptoms.

Indexing (details)


Subject
School counseling;
Clinical psychology
Classification
0519: School counseling
0622: Clinical psychology
Identifier / keyword
Education; Psychology
Title
Childhood physical and sexual abuse and adult mental health outcomes
Author
Deliramich, Aimee N.
Number of pages
56
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
1418
Source
MAI 47/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109111477
Advisor
Frueh, B. Christopher
University/institution
University of Hawai'i at Hilo
University location
United States -- Hawaii
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1465873
ProQuest document ID
305170914
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305170914
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