Abstract/Details

Race, altruism and trust: Experimental evidence from South Africa


2004 2004

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Abstract (summary)

This work examines the salience of group identity in explaining the behavior of high school students in South Africa, the first generation of post-apartheid school pupils. The evidence suggests that group identity matters, not only when it is a relatively temporary identity that is easily changed as in the case of school affiliation, but more particularly, for a binding identity such as race. However, group identity on its own may be insufficient to produce in-group favoritism, and its effect is different: depending on whether or not strategic concerns are present in the choice at hand. Moreover, it will depend on the extent of group connectedness, the permeability of group boundaries, the salience of the group identity and its correlation with socio-economic differences, and the evolving nature and composition of social institutions such as schools and peer groups. The evidence, for the most part, is encouraging, suggesting that as South African society continues to transform itself through greater efforts towards racial integration and reconciliation in every sphere of life, this will inevitably facilitate inter-group contact and friendships, which in turn will enhance miter-racial trust and empathy.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Economics;
Race;
Studies;
Group dynamics;
Secondary school students
Classification
0501: Economics
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Altruism; Behavioral economics; Race; South Africa; Trust
Title
Race, altruism and trust: Experimental evidence from South Africa
Author
Keswell, Justine Claire
Number of pages
136
Publication year
2004
Degree date
2004
School code
0118
Source
DAI-A 65/01, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Bowles, Samuel
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3118310
ProQuest document ID
305176744
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305176744
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