Abstract/Details

Transporting to TV -land: The impact of idealized character *identification on self and body image


2004 2004

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Abstract (summary)

In line with research in psychology and communication, it was hypothesized that individuals most likely to watch television and movies for escape and self-enhancement might be individuals who hold negative or anxious views of self. Results of a questionnaire study suggest that indeed, for young women in particular, lower self-esteem and increased body concerns are associated with increased transportation into media programs and increased connections with favorite characters. Results from a lab study indicate that identifying with an idealized character may influence implicit views of self and body image. Instructions to identify rather than contrast the self with an idealized character facilitated the association of self with positive words in a reaction time task. However, this effect was most pronounced for individuals low in body anxiety. Individuals high in body anxiety appear less willing to contrast the self with an idealized icon. This finding is explained in terms of chronic identification tendencies of anxious individuals, which may inhibit realistic appraisal processes. Ultimately, findings shed light on the reinforcing mechanisms that may keep vulnerable individuals enamored of potentially destructive and unrealistic media role models.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Social psychology
Classification
0451: Social psychology
Identifier / keyword
Psychology, Body image, Idealized, Identification, Self, Television
Title
Transporting to TV -land: The impact of idealized character *identification on self and body image
Author
Greenwood, Dara N.
Number of pages
69
Publication year
2004
Degree date
2004
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 65/06, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Pietromonaco, Paula
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3136733
ProQuest document ID
305176770
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305176770
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