Abstract/Details

Participation in PEAC vs. intramural sport on exercise self-efficacy, attitude toward exercise, and physical fitness


2010 2010

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of participation in PEAC courses at the University of Arkansas vs. participation in intramural sports on fitness measures, attitudes toward exercise, and exercise self-efficacy. Sixty students (26 females, 34 males) participated in this study. Students were in either one of three groups PEAC, intramural, or control. Baseline measures were taken for all three groups, and the PEAC and intramural groups participated in repeat testing at the end of either the PEAC course or the intramural season. ANOVA repeated measure tests were used to compare across groups for differences in baseline measures. Significance was set at the p < .05 level. Intramural students were found to have significantly lower body fat compared to the control group (p = .025). Intramural students were also found to have significantly greater estimated aerobic capacity compared to the control group (p = .025). Paired t-tests were used to assess changes due to participation in either a PEAC course or intramural sport. No significant improvements were found.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Physical education;
Kinesiology
Classification
0523: Physical education
0575: Kinesiology
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Education
Title
Participation in PEAC vs. intramural sport on exercise self-efficacy, attitude toward exercise, and physical fitness
Author
Matthews, Charles Andrew
Number of pages
72
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
0011
Source
MAI 48/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109762006
Advisor
Fort, Inza
University/institution
University of Arkansas
University location
United States -- Arkansas
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1484703
ProQuest document ID
305183090
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305183090
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.