Abstract/Details

Temporal characteristics of extraretinal signals during voluntary saccades and head roll in the dark


2004 2004

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Abstract (summary)

Purpose. An afterimage (AI) is perceived to move during voluntary saccades in the dark, which is attributed to the information from extraretinal eye-movement signals. The perceived AI displacement decreases with the frequency of equal-amplitude saccades, suggesting that the extraretinal signals for saccades are a temporally low-pass filtered version of the physical eye motion (Gruesser et al., Vision Res., 1987). Because retinal image motion results from head as well as eye movements, the goal of this study was to assess the extraretinal signals for voluntary head roll and compare the temporal-frequency dependence of these extraretinal signals to those associated with saccades.

Methods. Six normal observers synchronized voluntary horizontal saccades or shoulder-to-shoulder head roll in darkness to a metronome at frequencies from 0.5 to 1.7 Hz. During each trial, the observer represented the perceived change in AI direction during saccades or AI orientation during head roll using a hand-held rod. Eye movements were recorded by a ViewPoint Eye Tracker. Head movements and settings of perceived AI displacement or orientation change were recorded on video tape. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

Indexing (details)


Subject
Ophthalmology;
Neurology
Classification
0381: Ophthalmology
0317: Neurology
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Biological sciences
Title
Temporal characteristics of extraretinal signals during voluntary saccades and head roll in the dark
Author
Subramaniam, Shobana
Number of pages
139
Publication year
2004
Degree date
2004
School code
0087
Source
MAI 43/04M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
0496175688, 9780496175680
Advisor
Bedell, Harold E.
University/institution
University of Houston
University location
United States -- Texas
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1424344
ProQuest document ID
305195517
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305195517
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