Abstract/Details

Composite microstructures, microactuators and sensors for biologically inspired micro air vehicles


2004 2004

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Abstract (summary)

Unique among all nature's fliers, flying insects exhibit extreme maneuverability along with the ability to navigate in constricted environments. Advances in microrobotics, electroactive and composite materials, along with a greater understanding of the time-varying aero-dynamic forces generated by insect wings have lead to the exploration of millimeter-scale flapping-wing autonomous robotic insects. The micromechanical flying insect (MFI) project has the goal of creating a flying insect capable of sustained autonomous flight. This work describes the MFI project in detail with close attention to the design and construction of a thorax and wing transmission system, high power density actuators, and a class of biologically inspired sensors along with empirical results from each.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Electrical engineering;
Mechanical engineering
Classification
0544: Electrical engineering
0548: Mechanical engineering
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences; Air vehicles; Microactuators; Micromechanical flying insect; Robotics
Title
Composite microstructures, microactuators and sensors for biologically inspired micro air vehicles
Author
Wood, Robert John
Number of pages
179
Publication year
2004
Degree date
2004
School code
0028
Source
DAI-B 66/02, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542011665, 0542011662
Advisor
Fearing, Ronald S.
University/institution
University of California, Berkeley
University location
United States -- California
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3165604
ProQuest document ID
305211934
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305211934
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