Abstract/Details

History in “Foreign Affairs”, 1965–2000


2003 2003

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Abstract (summary)

This dissertation builds on the literature of "The Uses of History by Decision-Makers". It maintains that foreign policy-makers are influenced by ideas, which are generated with recourse to History, and disseminated through influential publications---one of the most influential of which is the US Council for Foreign Relations' journal, Foreign Affairs. It argues that the historical references in this journal, in terms of their scope and temporal origin, are a key input for US foreign policy-makers decisions. Where the choice of historical references can be criticized for being clichéd, biased or epistemologically flawed---as is the case in Foreign Affairs ---a corresponding negative impact on US foreign policy can be inferred. Furthermore, analysis of the choice of historical references in this journal supports the idea that a "Gravity model" rather than a "Generational model" may better predict the impact, durability and perceived relevance of historical events and individuals.

Indexing (details)


Subject
American history;
History;
Political science;
Mass media
Classification
0337: American history
0578: History
0615: Political science
0708: Mass media
Identifier / keyword
Communication and the arts; Social sciences
Title
History in “Foreign Affairs”, 1965–2000
Author
Jones, Milo
Number of pages
68
Publication year
2003
Degree date
2003
School code
1502
Source
MAI 45/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Wiener, Jarrod
University/institution
University of Kent, Brussels School of International Studies (Belgium)
University location
Belgium
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1442293
ProQuest document ID
305217230
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305217230/abstract
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