Abstract/Details

The role of parental love inconsistency in the development of narcissism and aggression


2010 2010

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Abstract (summary)

Previous research has suggested a potential association between parental love inconsistency and narcissism (Trumpeter, Watson, O'Leary, & Weathington; 2008) as well as between narcissism and aggression (Bushman & Baumeister, 1998; Stucke & Sporer, 2002; Weise & Tuber, 2004). The present study investigated the relationship among parental love inconsistency, narcissism, and aggression, while controlling for social desirability. Self-report surveys of parental love inconsistency, narcissism, aggression and social desirability were completed with a sample of 119 college students. Findings revealed that both parental love inconsistency and narcissism were significant predictors of aggression. Social desirability failed to produce a significant association with narcissism, which was contrary to the hypothesis. The results of this research suggest that ineffective parenting may prove to be a viable pathway by which to examine personality pathology and aggression. Potentially, aggressive tendencies in adulthood may be linked to problematic parental relations in childhood.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Mental health;
Developmental psychology;
Clinical psychology;
Personality psychology
Classification
0347: Mental health
0620: Developmental psychology
0622: Clinical psychology
0625: Personality psychology
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Psychology; Aggression; Narcissism; Parental relations
Title
The role of parental love inconsistency in the development of narcissism and aggression
Author
Migliosi, Bonnie
Number of pages
79
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
1341
Source
DAI-B 71/05, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109760910
Advisor
Muse-Burke, Janet L.
University/institution
Marywood University
University location
United States -- Pennsylvania
Degree
Psy.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3407216
ProQuest document ID
305241781
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305241781
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