Abstract/Details

Internet identity theft: An insight into victimology and law enforcement response


2010 2010

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Abstract (summary)

As a crime, identity theft is a growing issue in the United States. However, research regarding this topic is limited in its scope. The aim of this study was to assess Internet identity theft victimization from both victim precipitation and institutionalization theoretical perspectives—particularly, which theory and its tenets would most influence the reporting of an incident of Internet identity theft. Methodologically, data was retrieved from N = 70 respondents living in the Rio Grande Valley, Texas, via a 70-question survey over the Internet and analyzed using multiple regression to determine the variables most influential on the reporting of an Internet identity theft incident. It was predicted that the study would affirm victim precipitation theory. The results of the 70 variables tested did not reflect positively toward the victim precipitation hypothesis. The only variable that showed any possible influence on the likelihood someone would report an incident was the respondent knowing what law enforcement agency to contact. The findings essentially affirmed the tenets of institutionalization theory and law enforcement response, leaving the victim's perspective and/or actions in the crime still untapped.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Law;
Criminology;
Web Studies;
Internet;
Identity theft;
Law enforcement
Classification
0398: Law
0627: Criminology
0646: Web Studies
Identifier / keyword
Communication and the arts; Social sciences; Fraud; Identity theft; Institutionalization; Internet; Law enforcement; Victim precipitation
Title
Internet identity theft: An insight into victimology and law enforcement response
Author
Gray, Kelly
Number of pages
173
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
1351
Source
DAI-A 71/03, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109637915
Advisor
Esmail, Ashraf
Committee member
McDougall, Betsy; Pascarella, Joseph
University/institution
Capella University
Department
School of Human Services
University location
United States -- Minnesota
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3391484
ProQuest document ID
305246129
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305246129
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