Abstract/Details

The effects of impulsivity, self-efficacy, and depression on body mass index


2010 2010

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Abstract (summary)

There are a number of factors that have been found to be effective in weight loss but little is known about factors influencing weight loss maintenance. This study examined the effects of impulsivity, weight self-efficacy, and depression on weight regain in previously obese participants. This study tested 4 hypotheses using a retrospective quasi-experimental design with 281 participants. People were assigned to groups based on whether they had lost at least 10% of their body weight and maintained it (n=123) or lost at least 10% of their body weight and gained weight back within the past 3 years (n=158).

In an examination of the effects of impulsivity, weight self-efficacy, and depression on weight regain, only 1 componenet of impulsivity was statistically significant. For each unit increase in the nonplanning impulsiveness score, the odds ratio indicated a propensity for weight regain rather than weight maintenance. Maintenance of weight loss was found to be independent of gender and marital status, but dependent on age, and education level. The results of the study were compared to previous research and discussed in terms of clinical implications, limitations, and implications for future research.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Clinical psychology;
Physiological psychology
Classification
0622: Clinical psychology
0989: Physiological psychology
Identifier / keyword
Psychology; Body mass index; Depression; Impulsivity; Obesity; Self-efficacy; Weight loss
Title
The effects of impulsivity, self-efficacy, and depression on body mass index
Author
Romancini, Carrie Nicole
Number of pages
116
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
1435
Source
DAI-B 70/06, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109212709
Advisor
Petersen, Suni
University/institution
Alliant International University, Fresno
University location
United States -- California
Degree
Psy.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3362255
ProQuest document ID
305267005
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305267005
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