Abstract/Details

Parent expectations of collegiate teaching and caring


2006 2006

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

This exploratory research determined parent expectations of their traditionally-aged student's postsecondary institution with an investigator developed and validated survey entitled the PECTAC (Parent Expectations of Collegiate Teaching and Caring). The PECTAC instrument was predicated upon a culling from relevant literature to reflect topics and issues related to the teaching and caring functions of a private and religiously-affiliated Midwestern university. Parent participants were asked to provide basic demographic information in addition to ranking each item based on perceived importance.

A web-based survey software package was used to collect data from 475 participants. Dependent variables of parent gender and first-time college parent status were used to investigate differences between and among various sub-populations.

The findings from the study allowed for claiming the following: female parents expected significantly more from the university with regard to caring and teaching functions; status as a first-time college parent was not perceived to be of notable importance; and parents considered the caring functions to be of greater importance than the teaching functions.

Indexing (details)


Subject
School administration;
Academic guidance counseling
Classification
0514: School administration
0519: Academic guidance counseling
Identifier / keyword
Education; Caring; Collegiate; Parent expectations; Teaching
Title
Parent expectations of collegiate teaching and caring
Author
Young, W. Wayne, Jr.
Number of pages
180
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
0138
Source
DAI-A 67/10, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542905841
Advisor
Stick, Sheldon L.
University/institution
The University of Nebraska - Lincoln
University location
United States -- Nebraska
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3236911
ProQuest document ID
305272142
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305272142
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.