Abstract/Details

Wyoming public school administrators' perceptions and practices regarding the performance evaluation of occupational, physical, and speech -language therapists


2006 2006

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

This descriptive survey study examined the performance evaluation practices used to evaluate occupational, physical, and speech-language therapists working in Wyoming public schools. Of Wyoming public school special education directors and principals, 194 participated in this study, resulting in a 66% return rate.

Findings indicated that special education directors were the most frequent evaluators of all three types of therapists. The results also suggested that some occupational, physical, and speech-language therapists who worked in Wyoming public schools received no performance evaluations.

Results revealed that administrators had more knowledge, time, responsibility, and effectiveness related to the evaluation of speech-language therapists in comparison with the evaluation of occupational and physical therapists.

Findings indicated that more speech-language therapists were district-owned (hired by school districts as direct employees of school districts) and more occupational and physical therapists were contracted (hired by school districts via agreements with outside agencies or private practices). The study also found that more Wyoming school districts had policies for the evaluation of speech-language therapists compared to policies for the evaluation of occupational and physical therapists.

Recommendations were provided for Wyoming public school districts, Wyoming public school administrators, Wyoming higher education institutions, and the Wyoming Department of Education. Among the recommendations provided was the need for standardized performance evaluation practices for all contracted and district-owned occupational, physical, and speech-language therapists in Wyoming public schools. It was also recommended that Wyoming school administrators receive on-going training and education about therapy services and performance evaluation best practices.

Based on the findings of this study, it was recommended that future research determine if there are any significant differences between performance evaluation practices used for contracted versus district-owned therapists. It was also recommended that future research examine the reason(s) for the differences in performance evaluation practices used for speech-language therapists compared to those used for occupational and physical therapists.

Indexing (details)


Subject
School administration;
Special education;
Rehabilitation;
Therapy;
Speech therapy;
Health care;
Public schools
Classification
0514: School administration
0529: Special education
0382: Rehabilitation
0382: Therapy
0460: Speech therapy
0769: Health care
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences, Education, Occupational therapists, Performance evaluation, Physical therapists, Public school administrators, Speech-language therapists, Wyoming
Title
Wyoming public school administrators' perceptions and practices regarding the performance evaluation of occupational, physical, and speech -language therapists
Author
Jones, Ann M.
Number of pages
124
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
0138
Source
DAI-A 67/10, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542905773
Advisor
Uerling, Donald F.
University/institution
The University of Nebraska - Lincoln
University location
United States -- Nebraska
Degree
Ed.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3236904
ProQuest document ID
305275331
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305275331
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.