Abstract/Details

A microscale investigation of naphthalene dissolution and biodegradation


2006 2006

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Abstract (summary)

Biodegradation of PAHs by soil microbes is often hindered because the compounds are not always available to the microorganisms responsible for metabolism. Light microscopy, with digital photography and image analysis, was used to observed naphthalene dissolution. A small scale flow cell containing a naphthalene crystal was viewed at 100x magnification. Abiotic, biotic, and azide-inhibited systems were examined in this experimental system. Changes in the crystal's mass were determined from image analysis, and changes in the aqueous naphthalene's mass were determined with a fluorescence detector. Naphthalene's mass decreased approximately 6 x 10-3 mg/hr, 1.5 x 10-3 mg/hr, and 1.0 x 10-3 mg/hr for abiotic, biotic, and azide-inhibited experiments, respectively. Cellular material around the crystal caused slower dissolution rates for the biotic and azide-inhibited experiments. There was no evidence that bacterial metabolism was occurring in the system. A model was developed which underestimated the dissolution rate by approximately one order of magnitude.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Environmental science
Classification
0768: Environmental science
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences
Title
A microscale investigation of naphthalene dissolution and biodegradation
Author
Sullivan, Michelle Anne
Number of pages
44
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
0153
Source
MAI 44/06M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542690082
Advisor
Pfaender, Frederic K.
University/institution
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
University location
United States -- North Carolina
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1435022
ProQuest document ID
305285207
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305285207
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