Abstract/Details

Vagueness


2006 2006

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Abstract (summary)

This dissertation concerns a special problem posed by the vagueness of ordinary language for the enterprise of giving a coherent semantic theory of natural language. The problem engendered by vagueness is the lack of sharp boundaries between semantic categories. The first three chapters of this dissertation show how three traditional approaches to this problem fail for similar reasons. The three approaches considered are degree theories, supervaluations, and context dependence theories. I then consider attempts to handle this problem by employing a form of semantic anti-realism called "the modeling approach." Finally, I endorse a judgment-dependent approach to the problem and consider its historical antecedents and one contemporary version of the theory. Only by allowing judgment to play a role in determining truth conditions in context, it is argued, can we hope to provide a plausible solution to the problem posed by sharp boundaries.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Philosophy
Classification
0422: Philosophy
Identifier / keyword
Philosophy, religion and theology; Semantic antirealism; Supervaluations; Vagueness
Title
Vagueness
Author
Bell, Thomas J., II
Number of pages
119
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
0118
Source
DAI-A 67/01, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542522291
Advisor
Bricker, Phillip
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3206215
ProQuest document ID
305302852
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305302852
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