Abstract/Details

Survival and movement of Atlantic salmon (<i>Salmo salar</i>) in freshwater


2006 2006

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Abstract (summary)

Survival and movement are fundamentally important processes that structure vertebrate populations. For mobile populations, mortality and emigration represent the only two ways that individuals are lost from a population and because each acts in concert with the other, it is neither possible nor practical to estimate or consider one with out estimating or considering the other. When it comes to Atlantic salmon, growth is a third factor that is inextricably linked to the fate of individuals. The individual-based approach used in this work facilitated disentangling these three processes for multiple Atlantic salmon cohorts in two streams in New England. Advancements of this work include: (1) development and testing of stationary passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag detection techniques for tracking movement of stream fish; (2) new methods to incorporate emigration information into capture-mark-recapture models to assist in decoupling emigration from true mortality; (3)  elucidating the effect of local movement on estimates of true survival; and (4) examining the effects of size on growth, survival and movement over multiple seasons.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Ecology;
Zoology
Classification
0329: Ecology
0472: Zoology
Identifier / keyword
Biological sciences; Atlantic salmon; Freshwater; Movement; Salmo salar; Survival
Title
Survival and movement of Atlantic salmon (<i>Salmo salar</i>) in freshwater
Author
Horton, Gregg Eugene
Number of pages
161
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 67/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542978210
Advisor
Letcher, Benjamin H.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3242375
ProQuest document ID
305303072
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305303072
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