Abstract/Details

State power, world trade, and the class structure of a nation: An overdeterminist class theory of national tariff policy


2006 2006

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Abstract (summary)

This dissertation develops a new non-essentialist theory of the global trade policies pursued by the contemporary state, focusing especially upon modern tariff policy. Though a topic attracting perhaps unprecedented analysis throughout the history of economic thought, this understanding differs from existing theory in two important ways: (i) its incorporation of overdeterminist logic in understanding the workings of a deeply interconnected world economy; (ii) its utilization of class theory in delineating the existence of manifold processes of surplus value creation and distribution comprising a global class structure. In these two concepts, overdetermination and class, this dissertation presents a new understanding of trade controls, and a new argument against their use as economic policy. Case studies include examination of the emergence and impact of trade protection in post-colonial American society, and new insight into the rise of the Asian Miracle economies and New Protectionism of the late twentieth century.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Economic theory;
Economics;
Business costs;
International trade;
State laws;
Economic policy;
Studies
Classification
0511: Economic theory
0501: Economics
0505: Business costs
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences, Class structure, Globalization, State power, Tariff policy, World trade
Title
State power, world trade, and the class structure of a nation: An overdeterminist class theory of national tariff policy
Author
Guzik, Erik E.
Number of pages
440
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
0118
Source
DAI-A 67/04, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542656361
Advisor
Resnick, Stephen A.; Wolff, Richard D.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3215752
ProQuest document ID
305303243
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305303243
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