Abstract/Details

After the revolution: The individualist anarchist journal “Der Einzige” and the making of the radical Left in the early post -World War I Germany


2006 2006

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Abstract (summary)

My dissertation brings to light the critical power exercised by the much-neglected German individualist anarchist weekly Der Einzige. The journal appeared in 1919 and was edited by two exceptional German intellectuals, Anselm Ruest (Ernst Salomon) and Mynona (Salomo Friedlaender). Following the legacy of Max Stirner and Friedrich Nietzsche, Der Einzige aimed at a fundamental re-evaluation of philosophical and literary discourses regarding humanism, the state, nationalism, and revolutionary politics. More specifically, my study focuses on how the journal performed a practice of anarchism that was intimately bound up with literary modernism. This focus helps me argue for the relevance of the revolutionary thought of this journal to post-Cold War attempts to reinvigorate the tactics and philosophy of the Left.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Germanic literature;
Philosophy
Classification
0311: Germanic literature
0422: Philosophy
Identifier / keyword
Philosophy, religion and theology; Language, literature and linguistics; Anarchist; Anselm Ruest; Einzige; Ernst Salomon; Friedlaender, Salomo; Germany; Individualist; Interwar period; Journal; Max Stirner; Mynona; Radical Left; Revolution; Ruest, Anselm; Salomo Friedlaender; Salomon, Ernst; Stirner, Max
Title
After the revolution: The individualist anarchist journal “Der Einzige” and the making of the radical Left in the early post -World War I Germany
Author
Parvulescu, Constantin
Number of pages
189
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
0130
Source
DAI-A 67/08, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542836534
Advisor
Zipes, Jack
University/institution
University of Minnesota
University location
United States -- Minnesota
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3230243
ProQuest document ID
305304843
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305304843
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