Abstract/Details

Psychoanalyzing communication: Language, subjectivity, symbolization


2006 2006

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Abstract (summary)

In contradistinction to social scientific theories of communication, this dissertation poses the philosophical question of why humans communicate to begin with. Drawing on the psychoanalytic theory of Jacques Lacan (1966/2006), it is argued that human being communicates not merely due to a need to overcome its separation from other human beings. Rather, it is argued that because language splits it into self and other, human being communicates due to an unconscious desire to overcome its separation from itself. The self-alienating cause of the subject of communication is explained via Lacan's theory of the dialectic of identification and the effect of symbolization. Three studies of visual communication are offered (on evil, ethics, and the event of being) to illustrate how the symbolic content of expressive media is tied irrevocably to the question of what it means to be human. In so doing, the direct relevance of psychoanalysis to the study of media and communication is demonstrated.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Philosophy;
Mass media
Classification
0422: Philosophy
0708: Mass media
Identifier / keyword
Philosophy, religion and theology, Communication and the arts, Communication, Psychoanalyzing, Subjectivity, Symbolization
Title
Psychoanalyzing communication: Language, subjectivity, symbolization
Author
Butchart, Garnet C.
Number of pages
184
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
0118
Source
DAI-A 67/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542977701
Advisor
Chang, Briankle G.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3242339
ProQuest document ID
305305342
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305305342
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