Abstract/Details

From the discovery to rationalization of others' lies: How perceivers process and judge deception


2006 2006

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Abstract (summary)

The present project tested a theoretical framework for the deception judgment process. The framework argues that the deception judgment process begins when a perceiver first becomes suspicious of deception. This engages the perceiver to attempt to verify the speaker's claims. If the claims are deemed untrue, in an effort to classify the statement as a lie, the perceiver then examines the speaker's motives. If deemed a lie, the perceiver decides what to do about the deception, often taking into consideration the speaker's motives for lying. Three studies tested this framework. The first study examined the information perceivers used to distinguish lies from non-lies; the second study examined how the various forms of information were utilized and weighed in the deception judgment process; and finally, the third study examined the information processing strategies perceivers used to process deception. Overall, it was found that perceivers used several forms of information (e.g., logical inconsistencies, facts, and motives) when considering and judging deception. However, only facts were used to draw a conclusion regarding a statement's deceptiveness. In terms of processing strategies, support was found for an information-processing ordering effect consistent with the proposed model. Implications and future research are discussed.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Social psychology;
Occupational psychology
Classification
0451: Social psychology
0624: Occupational psychology
Identifier / keyword
Psychology, Deception, Lies, Perceivers, Rationalization
Title
From the discovery to rationalization of others' lies: How perceivers process and judge deception
Author
Weiss, Brent
Number of pages
119
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 67/01, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542522109, 0542522101
Advisor
Feldman, Robert
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3206196
ProQuest document ID
305305392
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305305392
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