Abstract/Details

Physical and chemical characterizations of block copolymer membranes


2003 2003

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Abstract (summary)

Amphiphilic macromolecules are known to spontaneously self-assemble into several microphases depending on numerous factors. However, physical and chemical mesoscale properties that arise from fundamental molecular parameters remain largely unknown. With these questions in mind, a systematic study of one class of diblock copolymers was undertaken to determine relationships governing physical properties. Techniques such as micropipette manipulation and electroporation were used to probe phenomena at the single vesicle level. The results highlight the important role of the interfacial nature of these assemblies, as well as static and dynamic effects arising from molecular weight. These soft structures can be further stabilized, providing means to extend and control properties dramatically. The results are intended to aid in the rational design of self-assemblies.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Chemical engineering
Classification
0542: Chemical engineering
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences; Block copolymer; Electroporation; Membranes; Self-assembly; Vesicles
Title
Physical and chemical characterizations of block copolymer membranes
Author
Bermudez, Harry
Number of pages
93
Publication year
2003
Degree date
2003
School code
0175
Source
DAI-B 64/06, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Discher, Dennis E.; Hammer, Daniel A.
University/institution
University of Pennsylvania
University location
United States -- Pennsylvania
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3095860
ProQuest document ID
305306699
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305306699
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