Abstract/Details

Reconstructing the East Asian monsoon response to major volcanic eruptions: A test of model skill with instrumental and paleoclimate data


2006 2006

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Abstract (summary)

Global and regional-scale climatic changes caused by volcanic eruptions are difficult to discern conclusively based on limited 20th century climate records. Analyses of paleoclimate records and global climate model (GCM) simulations indicate that a significantly increased volcanic signal occurs in East Asia in response to historical eruptions, many of which were much larger than those experienced in the 20th century. Records of historical floods vs. drought in eastern China suggest that major eruptions over the past millennium typically led to a relatively wet north and a dry south. The GCM simulates a 10% reduction in the strength of tropical Hadley circulation and significantly decreased precipitation throughout the tropics under Tambora-like volcanic forcing conditions. The volcanic-induced weakening of the West Pacific sub-tropical high apparently contributes to a decrease in modeled precipitation throughout northeastern China. Meanwhile a general decrease in tropical precipitation resulting from reduced incoming solar radiation and lower evaporation is hypothesized to have caused observed (and modeled) decreases in summertime precipitation in southeastern China.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Atmosphere
Classification
0608: Atmosphere
Identifier / keyword
Pure sciences; Climate; East Asian monsoon; Paleoclimate; Volcanic eruptions
Title
Reconstructing the East Asian monsoon response to major volcanic eruptions: A test of model skill with instrumental and paleoclimate data
Author
Bradbury, James A.
Number of pages
363
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 67/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542978180
Advisor
Bradley, Raymond S.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3242372
ProQuest document ID
305306846
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305306846
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