Abstract/Details

The role of feature accessibility in memory conjunction errors


2006 2006

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Abstract (summary)

Memory conjunction error is a common phenomenon that occurs when we incorrectly combine parts of previously experienced memories to create an entirely new memory. For example, such an error has occurred when a person remembers seeing the word toothache after viewing the words toothpick and earache instead. Two theories have been proposed in the literature to account for the mechanisms underlying such errors. In one account, memory conjunction errors occur because features stored in episodic memory are incorrectly conjoined. In another account, memory conjunction errors occur simply because conjunction lures seems familiar. In an attempt to distinguish the two theories, the current research focuses on the differences between retrieval mechanisms. Experiment 1 introduces and examines an important factor, the accessibility of episodic features. Experiment 2 further confirms that feature accessibility plays an important role in the occurrence of feature errors. Experiment 3 investigates the retrieval dynamics of the two types of episodic features. The current data pose major problems for the binding theory's claim about a feature binding process occurring at retrieval. Taken as a whole, the current data also show that unified events can be represented differently in episodic memory depending on the nature of the associated features.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Cognitive therapy
Classification
0633: Cognitive therapy
Identifier / keyword
Psychology, Episodic memory, Feature accessibility, Memory conjunction errors
Title
The role of feature accessibility in memory conjunction errors
Author
Wong, Mungchen
Number of pages
111
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 67/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542977640
Advisor
Rotello, Caren M.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3242333
ProQuest document ID
305306898
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305306898
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