Abstract/Details

On the computations underlying infants' representation of objects and number


2003 2003

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Abstract (summary)

A central focus of cognitive psychology is: What is the format of the mental representations that store information, and what computations can we perform over these representations? This research explores answers to these questions for the case of infants' representation of the concept “object.” In a series of studies using a choice method and a manual search method, an abrupt limit was found on the number of objects infants could track (Chapters 2 and 3). Infants successfully tracked and compared representations of 1, 2, and 3 objects. However, they failed with larger numerosities, even when the ratio between numerosities was highly discriminable. This pattern implicates object-files as the representations underlying infants' performance. Further experiments asked what computations infants can make over these object-file representations. Results suggest that between the ages of 7- to 14-months, infants can sum over properties (such as surface area) bound to object-file representations (Chapters 1 and 2), can compare the number of objects in one set with that in another (Chapter 3), and can bind representations of objects into mental sets, thereby increasing their capacity to remember individual objects (Chapter 4).

Indexing (details)


Subject
Developmental psychology;
Cognitive therapy
Classification
0620: Developmental psychology
0633: Cognitive therapy
Identifier / keyword
Psychology; Infants; Mental representation; Object files
Title
On the computations underlying infants' representation of objects and number
Author
Feigenson, Lisa
Number of pages
162
Publication year
2003
Degree date
2003
School code
0146
Source
DAI-B 64/09, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Carey, Susan
University/institution
New York University
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3105860
ProQuest document ID
305314460
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305314460
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