Abstract/Details

Negative priming and covert attention: Implications for studying clinical populations with attentional deficits


2003 2003

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Abstract (summary)

We investigated the covert attention processes at play when selecting task-relevant information and filtering out task-irrelevant information using a modified Negative Priming (NP) paradigm. We disambiguated covert attention—which occurs in the absence of eye movements—from overt attention by presenting lateralized stimuli for brief durations. Subjects determined whether a target was symmetrical or asymmetrical, attending covertly to the lateralized target while fixating centrally. When the target was difficult to select (Overlapping-Distractor condition), negative priming occurred: Previous viewing of the target impaired performance. However, when the distractor was easy to select (Contralateral-Distractor condition), positive priming occurred: Previous viewing of the target facilitated performance. Results indicate that even under conditions of covert attention, the selection process included a construction of the representation of the novel target as well as of the novel task-irrelevant distractor.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Psychology;
Experiments
Classification
0623: Psychology
0623: Experiments
Identifier / keyword
Psychology; Attention deficits; Covert attention; Negative priming
Title
Negative priming and covert attention: Implications for studying clinical populations with attentional deficits
Author
Frieder, Karen S.
Number of pages
39
Publication year
2003
Degree date
2003
School code
0146
Source
DAI-B 64/05, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Carrasco, Marisa
University/institution
New York University
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3089386
ProQuest document ID
305314660
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305314660
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