Abstract/Details

The effect on creativity of individual differences in affective processing and day-to-day affective experiences


2003 2003

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

The relation between creativity and mood has been often studied, but much less is known about the relation between creativity and more stable individual differences in affective processing. Four major dimensions of affective processing have been identified in previous research: namely, attention to affect, affective clarity, affective expression, and intensity of affect (Gohm & Clore, 2002). In the initial phase of this study, 163 participants completed measures of these four dimensions and of the traits from McCrae & Costa's (e.g., 1999) five-factor model of personality. Then, for each of the next seven days, participants made daily ratings of their feelings and recorded the amount of time they devoted to 11 specific activities (e.g., watching television, sleeping, conversing). Lastly, in a one-hour laboratory session, participants completed drawing, writing, advertisement, and science tasks developed by Lubart & Sternberg (1995). Later, judges rated participants' work on these tasks with respect to creativity. Attention to affect and the five-factor trait of openness were predictive of judges' ratings of participant creativity and of the amount of time participants devoted to creative activities in their daily lives. In contrast, affective clarity and conscientiousness were negatively related to the creativity ratings. Whereas participants' daily feelings were not predictive of the creativity ratings, the amount of time participants devoted to creativity-related activities (e.g., drawing, decorating, keeping a journal) during the week was positively related to the creativity ratings.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Personality
Classification
0625: Personality
Identifier / keyword
Psychology; Affective processing; Creativity; Emotion; Personality
Title
The effect on creativity of individual differences in affective processing and day-to-day affective experiences
Author
Long, Christopher R.
Number of pages
97
Publication year
2003
Degree date
2003
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 64/10, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Averill, James
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3110526
ProQuest document ID
305321189
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305321189
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.