Abstract/Details

The effects of background television on very young children's play with toys


2003 2003

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Abstract (summary)

The present study investigated the effects of background television, or television designed for adults, on very young children's play with toys. One-, 2-, and 3-year-old children were individually observed playing with an array of toys in the lab for one hour. For each child, during half of the one-hour session, a TV set played the television program Jeopardy! ; during the other half of the session, the TV set was off. For the first half hour, the average duration of play episodes was reduced at all ages in the presence of background television. Given that overall levels of looking at the television were low (about 3.2% of their time in the first half hour), this effect is probably due to a generalized interference from television (perhaps tied to its auditory features) rather than looking at the set. One-year-olds specifically had less focused attention in the presence of background television. These results were not obtained for the second half hour. Only three-year-old boys had shorter play episodes in the presence of background television. The data suggests that background television may have a disruptive effect on very young children's play with toys, especially when the toys and the room are novel to the children.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Developmental psychology
Classification
0620: Developmental psychology
Identifier / keyword
Psychology, Attention, Children, Play, Television, Toys
Title
The effects of background television on very young children's play with toys
Author
Evans, Marie K.
Number of pages
101
Publication year
2003
Degree date
2003
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 64/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Anderson, Daniel R.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3110483
ProQuest document ID
305322189
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305322189
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