Abstract/Details

Cycle decomposition, Steiner trees, and the facility layout problem


2003 2003

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Abstract (summary)

The facility layout problem is modelled as a cycle decomposition process in which the maximum-weight clique and travelling salesman problems are utilized to extract cycles from the graph adjacency matrix. The space between cycles is triangulated so the graph is maximally planar. The adjacency graph is then systematically developed into a block plan layout. With use of the maximum-weight clique algorithm, the procedure addresses layout problems that are not 100% dense. Many examples are utilized to demonstrate the flexibility of the algorithm and the resulting adjacency graph and block plan layout drawings.

The Steiner Circulation Network solution derived from an adjacency graph solution and its dual graph, provides a minimum cost system of hallways and connecting links for the material handling system. Using the flows between activities and departments in a layout problem, the circulation network provides the necessary link between the steps of finding the adjacency graph solution and finding useful block plan layout. A case study demonstrates how the solution for the layout and its material handling system can be integrated. Computational results up to size n = 100 are presented along with a comparative study with a competitive algorithm.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Operations research;
Industrial engineering
Classification
0796: Operations research
0546: Industrial engineering
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences, Cycle decomposition, Facility layout, Steiner trees
Title
Cycle decomposition, Steiner trees, and the facility layout problem
Author
Keen Patterson, Margaret
Number of pages
258
Publication year
2003
Degree date
2003
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 64/10, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Smith, J. MacGregor
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3110541
ProQuest document ID
305322724
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305322724
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