Abstract/Details

The physics and chemistry of solar nebula shock waves: Applications to chondrule formation


2003 2003

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Abstract (summary)

Chondrules are a major component of primitive meteorites and are thought to be among the first solids to have formed in the solar system. However, the circumstances around the formation of chondrules have remained a mystery for the 200 years that chondrules have been known to exist. In this work, a model is developed to show that shock waves in the nebula could have been responsible for the complex thermal processing that chondrules are thought to have experienced. By studying different sizes of shock waves, it is shown that for shock waves to have been the dominant chondrule producing mechanism in the nebula, the shocks would have to be large (>1000 km) in size. Such shocks may be linked to the formation or evolution of Jupiter within the solar nebula. In addition, the thermal evolution of chondrules by shock waves can explain the geometric properties of compound chondrules if these objects formed by the collisions of molten chondrules. Finally, for the first time, the case of a shock wave passing through an icy region of the solar nebula is studied. It is found that such a situation may have produced conditions that would allow silicates to be hydrated on very short time scales, explaining the presence of phyllosilicates in the accretionary rims around chondrules in CM chondrites.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Astronomy;
Astrophysics
Classification
0606: Astronomy
0606: Astrophysics
Identifier / keyword
Pure sciences; Chondrule; Meteorites; Shock waves; Solar nebula
Title
The physics and chemistry of solar nebula shock waves: Applications to chondrule formation
Author
Ciesla, Fred John
Number of pages
144
Publication year
2003
Degree date
2003
School code
0009
Source
DAI-B 64/05, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Hood, Lon L.
University/institution
The University of Arizona
University location
United States -- Arizona
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3089936
ProQuest document ID
305336854
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305336854/fulltextPDF
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