Abstract/Details

Nitric oxide modulates the firing activity of striatal neurons in response to electrical stimulation on the substantia nigra


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

Phasic dopamine (DA) transmission plays a critical role in the generation of movement. Recent studies suggest that DA may activate nitric oxide (NO)-interneurons in the striatum. NO is a potent modulator of striatal neuronal activity. Thus the potential intermediary role of NO in the modification of striatal firing rate under basal conditions and its response to phasic DA release induced by electrical stimulation of the substantia nigra pars compacta (A9) was examined using in vivo extracellular recordings. Systemic administration of the neuronal nitric oxide inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) (EC50 dose, 25mg/kg, i.p.) did not produce any significant effect on the firing rate of striatal neurons under basal conditions or during DA cell burst firing. While the current findings suggest that a partial depletion of NO tone does not affect the firing activity of striatal neurons directly, additional studies performed in identified neurons are necessary to substantiate these conclusions.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Neurology
Classification
0317: Neurology
Identifier / keyword
Biological sciences
Title
Nitric oxide modulates the firing activity of striatal neurons in response to electrical stimulation on the substantia nigra
Author
Liu, Danting
Number of pages
34
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
1489
Source
MAI 44/01M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542221163, 0542221160
Advisor
West, Anthony R.
University/institution
Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science
University location
United States -- Illinois
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1428043
ProQuest document ID
305341670
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305341670
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