Abstract/Details

Attributional styles of exercisers versus nonexercisers


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

The current study focused on the role of attributions in exercise. A sample of 117 undergraduate psychology and kinesiology students completed a general inventory of explanatory style, as well as a domain-specific inventory of explanatory style. A subsample of participants completed a 2-week long exercise journal. Results demonstrated that those who regularly exercise at least 30 minutes per day, 5 days per week, with the purpose of improving fitness, physical performance, or health have a more optimistic explanatory style than nonexercisers. The current study also investigated possible differences in exercisers and nonexercisers on factors of Controllability and Intentionality; however, the dimensions yielded no significant differences between exercisers and nonexercisers. Findings of the current study provide insight into understanding attributional style and attribution retraining as a means of encouraging exercise behavior.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Social psychology;
Personality;
Public health
Classification
0451: Social psychology
0625: Personality
0573: Public health
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Psychology
Title
Attributional styles of exercisers versus nonexercisers
Author
Muller, Josh Richard
Number of pages
113
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
6050
Source
MAI 44/02M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
0542272407, 9780542272400
Advisor
Rodrigues, Aroldo
University/institution
California State University, Fresno
University location
United States -- California
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1428678
ProQuest document ID
305349205
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305349205
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