Abstract/Details

The effects of transcutaneous electrical stimulation and submaximal swimming on blood lactate removal following a maximal effort 200 yard frontcrawl


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of recovery modes on lactate removal in swimmers. Thirty competitive swimmers (males, n = 17; females, n = 13) volunteered for the study. After warming up, participants sprinted a 200-yd frontcrawl and performed a 20-min randomized-counterbalanced recovery: rest, H-wave®, and submaximal swim. A multifactorial repeated measures 2 x 3 x 3 (sex, recovery mode, and time) ANOVA was conducted; a Scheffé's Confidence Interval was conducted for a significant interaction. Four simple effects were present: swim was significantly less than rest (p = .0019) at mid-recovery; H-wave® was significantly less than rest (p = .0063) at post-recovery; swim was significantly less than rest ( p < .0001) at post-recovery; and swim was significantly less than H-wave® (p < .0001) at post-recovery. H-wave® and submaximal swimming appear to be effective in reducing lactate; however, swimming reduced lactate to the greatest extent.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Sports medicine;
Anatomy & physiology;
Animals
Classification
0575: Sports medicine
0433: Anatomy & physiology
0433: Animals
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Biological sciences
Title
The effects of transcutaneous electrical stimulation and submaximal swimming on blood lactate removal following a maximal effort 200 yard frontcrawl
Author
Neric, Francis B.
Number of pages
84
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
6060
Source
MAI 44/01M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542163944, 0542163942
Advisor
Beam, William
University/institution
California State University, Fullerton
University location
United States -- California
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1427208
ProQuest document ID
305351092
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305351092
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